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week one of the men who helped bring rule to an end in tunisia was assassinated and france continues operations against al-qaeda and extremists in nearby mali. in egypt, there's growing opposition to president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. in syria the civil war continues and it's gotten more complex in the wake of israeli air strikes to keep damascus from shifting weapons to nearby lebanon. here to help explain recrenate vents is jon alterman the director of the mideast program at the center for strategic and international studies. sir, thank you for joining us. >> good to be with you. >> so let's start. in north africa we have recent events in tunisia and we have the french operations in mali which least initially appear successful and scattering the al-qaeda elements and separating them from the tuareg and insurgents. how's the united states need to deal with this in a broad way? does it need to be getting involved in both mali and more broadly in the region? what do we need to be doing? >> if you're talking about intervention mali it's a question of what you're tryin
the dozens of abandoned airplanes at the country's airport. >> the ruling party of tunisia has projected its own prime minister's decision to dissolve the government. there is a homecoming of shokri belaid's remains. they predict the dissolution of parliament announced by its own prime minister. the assassination has sparked mass protests in several major cities. now this report. >> the people here are pretty much aware of the implications of the assassination and the uncertainty that looms over the country. this is by the political establishment yesterday had a quick fix the problem. prime minister hamdi jebali said that he offered the technocratic government, refusing -- saying the offer to dissolve the government. the party says that it rejects a technocratic offer and they intend to stay in power. the other opposition parties want to include everyone in the talks and they don't want a democratic government. >> an inquiry by australia's top criminal investigation leaders has found widespread doping in professional sport. links to organized crime and the possibility of a match fixing. scan
, for the last of those years, country director for morocco and tunisia. earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work which we will see john out, up in northern mali. very delighted to have him on our team at the africa center, as well as as a friend. also delighted to have another ,ld friend, dr. ricardo renÉ dr. of science at binghamton university on islam. he has been a colleague, i might mention that he and i are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. delighted to have him as a scholar of the region and a friend and our wives have become friends as well. it is in the family, so to speak. last but not least, this dr. is a political scientist and senior fellow at the middle east program of the carnegie endowment. and author of quite a number of works, some quite prescient in their timing on al qaeda. you have their biographical notes for fuller details. one thing not in the notes, i cannot resist mentioning that while there are few discussions of the crisis in mali going around washington, this will be the only one where the panel speakers includes individuals who have b
government in tunisia is expected to be formed in the next few days. that's despite the alliance falling apart. the country is facing a political crisis after the assassination of an opposition politician last week. even a new government may not be able to help unify the deep political divisions. >> it is the latest dispute among a coalition beset by division. the leader of the coalition is now distancing himself from the party. he accuses the group of sidelining its allies and the dominating the government. >> there were political conflicts. every party would like to get something for himself or herself or itself to the next elections. >> and other secular member of the ruling coalition threatened to pull out, earlier. they all disagree. ho-- all disagree about how to end this crisis and what's best for tunisia. but the opposition has a different view. the popular front, a gathering of leftist parties, accuses ennhada of hijacking the 2011 revolution. >> the parliament has failed to draft constitution and tackle our problems. we are in a delicate situation and therefore we need exceptio
director in the office of the secretary of defense, and also country director for morocco and tunisia, and earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work, which i think you'll see brought out up 234 -- in northern mali including 30 trips in that region. ranging well, and delighted to have him on our team. another old friend, dr. ricardo, professor of political science and sociology and a corporation scholar on islam, ricardo, a good friend and colleague, and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i mentioned he and i are editing a book together in the north african revolution, but delighted to have him, and our wives have become friends as well. it's in the family so to speak. timely, last, but not least, dr. onwar, assistant professor of political science, and nonresident senior fellow at the carnegie endowment, and author of quite a number of works, some quite precious in their timing on al-qaeda in the islamic and its effects. you have their bigraphical notes for fuller details. i would note one thing not in the notes, and i can't resist mentioning that while there's few di
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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